Lantern Fly (Lycorma delicatula).

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Here are sites and info in the US I found helpful………………………………………………………………….

http://www.agriculture.pa.gov/Protect/PlantIndustry/spotted_lanternfly/Documents/Spotted%20Lanternfly%20%20Property%20Management.pdf

Great site for control management…..that is not for me ….still looking for a Natural no chemical management.

Guidelines for the Control of Spotted Lanternfly THE GUIDELINES BELOW ARE DESIGNED FOR CORTROL OF SPOTTED LANTERNFLY AND TREE OF HEAVEN AND REFERENCE THE USE OF PESTICIDES. WHEN USING ANY PESTICIDE, READ THE PESTICIDE LABEL FOR DIRECTIONS, APPLICATION RATES, APPLICATION METHODS, AND APPROPRIATE PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT. THESE GUIDELINES DO NOT CONSTITUE AN ENDORSEMENT OF ANY PRODUCT OR PESTICIDE PRODUCER. THE PESTICIDES REFERENCED HAVE NOT BEEN TESTED ON SPOTTED LANTERNFLY, SPECIFICALLY AND THEIR EFFICACY AGAINST THIS PEST IS UNKNOW.

Property owners can help contain and control spotted lanternfly (SLF) by implementing a management strategy using a combination of mechanical control, host reduction, and chemical control. These guidelines have been developed for use by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) Spotted Lanternfly Eradication Program. The guidelines target SLF at different stages of its lifecycle, and may lead to dramatic reduction in SLF populations where implemented.

Mechanical Control: October – July Mechanical control includes egg mass scraping and tree banding.

Egg Mass Scraping: SLF adults lay eggs starting in October and will continue to lay eggs through the first few hard frosts. SFL eggs are laid on many surfaces including trees, rocks, and manmade objects which are stored outside. Egg masses contain an average of 30-50 individual eggs, and are covered with wax. The wax, when it is first deposited, is light gray, but it takes on the appearance of mud as it dries. Property owners can scrape egg masses whenever encountered. This can be done using any hard or rigid tool such as a stick, a putty knife, or credit card. It is unknown if eggs scraped onto the ground can survive, so the best advice is to scrape egg masses in a downward direction into a container with rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer.

Tree Banding: SLF nymphs emerge from the egg masses in early May and pass through four nymph stages. The nymphs crawl up and down trees to feed each day. Though the nymphs can be found on many types of plants, they strongly prefer tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and banding these trees with an adhesive trap is effective in capturing the first three nymphal stages. The PDA Spotted Lanternfly Eradication Program can supply volunteers with tree bands for their property. Bands can also be purchased from private vendors. Research from Korea indicates that brown colored adhesive bands are most effective. Starting at the end of April bands should be placed on tree of heaven that are at least six inches wide at chest height. The adhesive portion of the tree band should be facing away from the tree surface and cut so that the edges of the band overlap each other by an inch. Push pins can be used to help secure the band. Bands should be replaced every two weeks until the last few weeks of July.
Although SLF will feed on other trees and plants, all life stages strongly prefer tree of heaven, and adult SLF seem to require a meal from these trees prior to laying eggs. This provides an opportunity to concentrate the SLF population on a property by performing host tree reduction. This method involves removal or killing of most tree of heaven on an infested property while leaving a few to serve as trap trees.

Tree of Heaven Control Methods: Control of tree of heaven requires suppression of the regenerating root system of this species. Because of this, many tree of heaven infestations require multiple treatments to control a population with continued monitoring for regrowth. Various methods of treatment may have to be utilized for complete control. Establishing a native or non-invasive groundcover may help in control of sprouts and seedlings following herbicide treatments.

Foliar sprays: A foliar spray with a recommended herbicide is the most common control for tree of heaven. The spray should cover the leaves and shoots that are at an attainable height. Foliar sprays are effective for control of sprouts and suckers, and are best if used with a surfactant to obtain better coverage and absorption into the leaves. Optimal time for treatment with a foliar spray is June to September.

Basal bark spray: Basal bark sprays can be an effective means of control for young tree of heaven that are less than four inches in diameter. Spray the recommended herbicide with an oil carrier on the lower twelve to eighteen inches of the stem, until the bark is wet, but not running off. This treatment works well for control of smaller trees in summer and late winter, as it chemically girdles the stem where applied.

Stump treatments: Applying a recommended herbicide to a freshly cut stump is essential to deter sprouting and suckering. Herbicide treatment should be made immediately after the cut so that it may be absorbed into the roots. This method works best during the active growing season of the tree from June through September.

Hack and Squirt: Hack and squirt treatment is an effective treatment for control of tree of heaven and is made by making a series of downward cuts into the bark with an axe or machete. The cuts which form small cups and are approximately chest height are made evenly around the tree. Herbicide is then applied to each cut where it is taken up into the tree. Hack and squirt does not girdle the stem as there is spacing between the cuts, which allows the herbicide to be transported through the trees conductive system. Best results occur during the June to September growing season.

https://extension.psu.edu/update-on-spotted-lanternfly-control-options

There is limited information on pesticide options for control of Spotted Lanternfly because is it a new pest to this area. This year, Penn State Extension is conducting efficiacy trials on products that are available to the homeowner for control on their property. Early this month, we began testing contact insecticides including horticultural oil, neem oil, insecticidal soap, and products that contained spinosad, carbaryl, bifenthrin, or pyrethrin as the active ingredient. Additionally, we included two systemic insecticides (both applied as soil drenches and one as a bark spray) in our preliminary trials.

Our initial observations suggest that some active ingredients produce better control than others. For those products with active ingredients of bifenthrin, pyrethrin, and carbaryl (from what was tested so far), we saw an immediate effect on caged lanternflies. There was some effect from neem oil and insecticidal soap, but results were variable. Also, the insects were not killed immediately with these products; it took several days to see the full effect. For the systemic products, the bark spray (active ingredient = dinotefuran) appears to outperform the drenches (dinotefuran and imidacloprid). We speculate that the drenches may do better if applied to the soil earlier in the season and may consider changing our study design for next year. Regardless, our 2017 study is a preliminary effort. Moreover, we have not completed collecting our data for the season.

Adult Spotted Lanternflies started emerging in early August. The female lanternflies are not reproductively mature at emergence. It is believed that they must feed on the Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) at some point in order to complete the life cycle. However, it is important to understand that the number of hosts on which the insect can complete its life cycle is unknown at this time. Other researchers are involved with determining primary and secondary host plants from opportunistic/accidental feeding. However, Penn State Extension is also monitoring the population for general reproductive status in order to adjust control tactics (if appropriate) to target pesticide applications prior to the onset of oviposition in the majority of the population in order to make additional control suggestions that may reduce the population of the following year

Always use pesticides carefully. Read the label to ensure your safety as well as that of the environment.

https://www.onenewspage.com/video/20170824/8776118/VIDEO-Spotted-lanternfly-threat-at-Clover-Hill-Vineyard.htm

//www.onenewspage.com/v/20170824/8776118.htm?width=480

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/269683079_Parasitism_Rate_of_Egg_Parasitoid_Anastatus_orientalis_Hymenoptera_Eupelmidae_on_Lycorma_delicatula_Hemiptera_Fulgoridae_in_China

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